Ashamed of What You’re Doing?

By Britt Malka | Email Marketing

Aug 10

We call it “earning an honest living” when we go to a job every day and work for eight hours, serving somebody else.

Unless you’re employed as an executioner or tax collector, you’re probably not ashamed of what you’re doing.

But as soon as we move over to being self-employed… Now, THAT’s a different animal.

One of my subscribers told me his story:

I hate the thought of people thinking I am just promoting because profits are involved. Even when you assure people you wouldn’t recommend anything if it wasn’t worth the money, skepticism sets in. Even when I write articles recommending something valuable I am skeptical.

Is this something you recognize in yourself?

What Will People Think?

It’s buried deep inside us, the fear of other people’s thoughts about us.

In most cases, it’s not even relevant. How much are you thinking of what other people are doing? Do you spend hours wondering if this marketer is promoting solely to make money, or is it something you decide in a split second?

Most people are like that. They don’t spend their days thinking about you. I’m sorry, but that’s just how it is, and this is both good and bad.

On the good side, it means you can relax. You’re not all that important to your list subscribers or blog readers.

Stop Wasting Time by Thinking about What People Are Thinking

You’re not changing people’s thoughts just by thinking about it.

Only your actions will change their minds, if they – in the first place – thought you were promoting only to make money. But maybe they never believed that, and you were worrying without good reason.

She’s So Generous, She Says…

Have you ever noticed how people, who claim to be something, often are the opposite?

Like the man telling everyone who cares to listen that he’s so generous… He’s often very stingy.

And the woman, who tells everyone how she never badmouthes people, and how she only speaks nice about other people… Yes, make sure you never turn your back on her, because she’ll badmouth you and stab you in your back.

And don’t use the same methods yourself, because your acts will speak louder.

If you’re an honest marketer, your subscribers will know. It might take time, but it’s the best way to let them know.

Or they will be like our dog, Tikva, when she was a puppy.

Her foster mother had been hit by a man, and somehow her fear transferred over to Tikva.

So when our son came home to live with us again, Tikva growled at him.

It didn’t help either that he had very fast movements, moving his hand fast towards her when he wanted to caress her.

Grrrrrr, said Tikva.

“You’re moving too fast,” said my husband. “Try slower movements towards her.”

My son is digital, like me, so he moved his hand extremely slowly towards Tikva. You could see what she was thinking. “Now what? How is he plotting to kill me now? He’s after something, I know it.”

Grrrrr, she said out aloud.

But Danni’s acts told her that she could trust him. He never hit her. He was always nice towards her, and after a while, because he gave it time, she loved him.

That kind of love is worth waiting for.

Doubt Your Own Acts?

Should you doubt your own intentions?

Yes. Because when you’re promoting stuff, you could be cheating yourself without wanting to. So it’s always important to investigate your intentions.

  • The product you’re promoting… is it a good choice for your audience?
  • Are you promoting it, because the nice product creator asked you to do it, and you hate letting him down?
  • Are you promoting it, because it’s an okay product, and it can make you a boatload of money because it has a crazy high conversion?
  • Or are you promoting it, because you love the product yourself and you feel certain that many of your subscribers will like it, too?
  • And you’re making money promoting it, but you truly believe it will help your list?

It’s not always black and white and easy to figure out.

It’s easy to get influenced by other people’s opinion. If everybody else is promoting a product, you didn’t like, maybe you’re wrong?

Maybe, yes, but it’s better to not promote in that case. Follow your intuition. And the following might help you make sure you’re doing the right thing, if you choose to promote:

Ask yourself this question: Would you tell your best friend to buy it because it would be really helpful to her?

(Assuming your best friend is in the same business, of course.)

Trust Yourself

If you’ve doubted your intentions, and analyzed them, and now you’re certain that you’re promoting this product, because it’s a good thing for your self, then stop doubting yourself.

Don’t worry about what people might think or might not think. That’s their problem.

You’re honest. You’re promoting something that will help them. You’re making money in the process, yes, but you earn that money in an honest way: You’re making a connection between a product creator and a customer who has a problem.

You’re solving a problem.

Isn’t it fair that you make money by solving problems for people?

Of course it’s fair, so don’t be ashamed of making money by doing a good thing.

If you’re wondering about what you should write in your daily mails, then this free report will be a huge help for you.

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(2) comments

Virginia August 10, 2016

Let me put a different slant on this.

Do you suppose people are tired of buying something and find themselves stepping into the quicksand of up-sell he11 which the seller did not warn them about?

The potential buyer may feel a little scammed when that happens. For me before I buy anything, I go to the affiliate page to get the whole picture. Amazing how many times I don’t buy!

Reply
    Britt Malka August 11, 2016

    Oh, that’s clever, Virginia.

    I try to remember to talk about upsells, but I forget too often, I’m afraid. Something I should be aware of. Good idea to check the affiliate page.

    Reply
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